Awesome: Endnotes do not save ‘Going Clear’

What a nice surprise in the Washington Post! 

Endnotes do not save ‘Going Clear’

Friday, January 25, 2:58 PM

Lisa Miller’s Jan. 20 review [“ There are fads and cults. Then there’s Scientology ,” Outlook] of Lawrence Wright’s book “ Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief ” decried bias against religious minorities, yet Wright’s book represents exactly that. Forty pages of endnotes may have impressed Miller, but what they refer to are a collection of stale, unfounded tabloid stories, decades-old false allegations and rank speculation mostly sourced to a handful of bitter individuals kicked out of the church a decade or more ago.

The Church of Scientology has identified more than 200 errors so far in the book, ranging from the wrong year for the marriage of Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes to the erroneous claim that the church owns a bank and schools in Clearwater, Fla., a claim Wright could have at least attempted to verify via public records. Wright also regurgitates news clippings without mentioning that the claims were later recanted — some under oath — or tossed out during judicial proceedings. So much for “endnotes.”

Miller’s review also failed to note that Wright’s United Kingdom and Canadian publishers chose not to publish the book, which speaks to the quality of his facts, allegations and sources. If a book tells the truth, would any publisher worry?

Millions of Scientologists around the world embrace the religion. Their experiences of happier and more fulfilling lives fuel the church’s international expansion, and our humanitarian programs help thousands daily. Since Wright began his research, we have opened 30 churches worldwide, a dozen in 2012 alone, and a National Affairs Office a half-mile from The Post. Those facts were not in Mr. Wright’s book or his endnotes.

Karin Pouw,
Los Angeles
The writer is director of public affairs for the Church of Scientology

Church Expansion and Fundraising Activities

Given the insane media reporting today, I wanted to repost something that went on ScientologyMyths.info about a year ago. Here it is:

Church Expansion and Fundraising Activities

Scientologists contribute voluntarily and generously to the Church both for the religious services in which they participate as well as to support the opening of new Ideal Scientology Organizations and the implementation of large‐scale humanitarian and social programs around the world.

A great number of international Church programs, particularly in the fields of drug education and rehabilitation, raising literacy standards and advancing human rights, are funded by grants from the International Association of Scientologists, which raises donations from its members without regard to their participation in any services.

Scientologists contribute because they want to receive the benefit of L. Ron Hubbard’s technology and they want millions of people world over to benefit from it too and thus achieve the Aims of Scientology.

The result of these efforts is unprecedented expansion in the actual delivery of Scientology religious services—an increase of 40 times over previous levels—and the religion now measured in terms of more than 10,000 Churches, Missions and affiliated groups, with millions of members in 167 countries.

It is no surprise this individual is complaining, with orgs reaching into their communities at unprecedented levels. L. Ron Hubbard (LRH) covers this in a Bulletin of 1 May 58 called SIGNS OF SUCCESS:

Whenever we’re really winning, the squirrels start to scream. You can tell if somebody is a squirrel. They howl or make trouble only when we’re winning. – LRH

What follows are applicable LRH references in response to specific claims made by some squirrels who, while claiming to be a “auditors” or “trained”, never did any of the Golden Age of Tech line up, never did the Basics Books and Lectures and wasn’t even around for the ACCs release.

Topics:

1. Squirrels
2. Rumors
3. Using Policy to Stop

4. International Association of Scientologists
5. Ideal Organizations
6. Donations for new buildings

7. PCs or Pre-OTs doing an Return/Advance Program
8. Length of time on Lower Grades
9. Nattering

Going Clear

Going Clear” is a goal that many Scientologists have. Not so anti-Scientologists like Lawrence Wright and the gang of haters he listens to. They prefer throwing mud and lies on honest and well-meaning people. How lame is that.

Enough said. Those interested, check this out: lawrencewrightgoingclear.com

Update (I opened the comments too):

This is rather amazing information about L. Ron Hubbard that I never knew (no, I won’t thank Mr. Lawrence Wrong for this, but wow…!):

>> Statement: [Pages 23-24]

Wright dredges up a false allegation from a book written over two decades ago that L. Ron Hubbard only went to China once:  “Hubbard made two voyages to visit his parents in Guam. One trip included a detour to China… His trip to China, which was organized by the YMCA, lasted only ten days.”

>> True Information: Mr. Hubbard took two trips to Asia.

The first was in May 1927 as he covers in his journal, shown in The L. Ron Hubbard Series, Early Years of Adventure, Letters and Journals. His journal entries are confirmed with ship manifests of the Gold Star.  During this voyage, a young L. Ron Hubbard visited ports in Guam, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Kobe (Japan) and Manila (Philippines).  He returned to the United States in July 1927 aboard the USS Nitro as shown in the same L. Ron Hubbard Series volume. (It goes on over some pages, read it yourself:  http://www.lawrencewrightgoingclear.com/wright/chapter-2/trip-to-china.html)

Or this one, a nice “fact-checking” failure: http://www.lawrencewrightgoingclear.com/wright/chapter-3/broken-arm.html

 

This ROCKS! Atlantic Article

screen

Here is a PDF of it: The_Atlantic_14 January 2013

A Sad Story of Tabloid Journalism

I am not saying something new when referring to tabloids as offensive to logical minds. But recently another magazine has joined the crowd of mind-boggling, hair-raising and nausea-inducing “news” magazines: Vanity Fair. Calling Maureen Orth’s recent Vanity Fair story about the Church of Scientology a “piece of trash” is actually an understatement. Even trash is more useful than Orth’s delusional rendition of the truth. The amount of unverified and misrepresented data in this article hits a new low in current journalism. And it is not a surprise to find out that it was completely based on the usual anti-Scientologist crowd a la Rathbun and Headley. Not one person presented in the story was actually talked to.  Headley, who just lost a second time in court against the Church and is notorious for changing his story as it suits him, is the grand “source” for Mrs. Orth. This journalist is a lost cause.

To save Vanity Fair, write to its editor at letters@vf.com . There might be some hope that they come to their senses. But we have to tell them about the erosion of quality that is happening right under their eyes.

The Church of Scientology issued a statement on the article. It is very well worth reading:

http://www.scientologynews.org/statements/csi-responds-to-vanity-fair.html

- L

Narconon and David Love

I just updated ScientologyMyths.info with some new information about Narconon. Check it out! 

Here is one of the articles (or, rather, creative copypasta, but hey, information is information!)

Facts: Narconon Controversy – Agent Provocateur David Love

Here are some interesting facts about the recent (August 2012) allegations against a Narconon facility in Canadian (Oklahoma), Narconon Arrowhead. It is from various letters to the media that were posted on media websites (e.g. Tampa Bay Times). All of the letters were sent by the Church of Scientology International.

Bottom Line: The current media attention on Narconon is generated by the same group of anti-Scientologists and their hangers. One of them is David Love, who I think is an agent provocateur.

See yourself:

David Love is an anti-Narconon extremist who has been trying to generate anti-Narconon and anti-Scientology in the press in recent weeks. Yesterday, he posted the following boast on a message board used by members of the cyber hate group Anonymous“Just spent over an hour with Investigative Reporter in Florida. NBC Rock Center this Thursday at 10:00 PM should be very good, but this reporter in Florida has ‘balls of steel’ and will not be intimidated whatsoever…the shit-storm clouds are about to open in multiple directions this Thursday – this Friday – and next Monday.” 

While we find the posting offensive, we also disagree with his characterization as a reporter of any metal would investigate sources who are vehemtly opposed to natural, legal, law abiding and well accepted practices of drug rehabilitation and discover how and why he must support drug proliferation.

Since you have become part of his “agenda”, it is important for you to report to your readers the facts about your source. David Love has engaged in a public relations smear campaign against Narconon since
leaving the program in Canada in October 2009. He has never been to Narconon Oklahoma and has no knowledge about it. He has bragged that he stole thousands of confidential documents from Narconon in Quebec. He has suggested in writing to counsel for Narconon that he is willing to cease his prodding of “numerous government and private investigations” into Narconon in exchange for payment.

In particular, Mr. Love sent Narconon and a Church of Scientology attorney an email stating:“I have a short window of opportunity to discuss a comfortable mediation concerning the numerous government and private investigations into matters before your organization. . .If . . .you are willing to sit down with my lawyer and I, it is possible that the issues at hand could be resolved amicably.”

This email was preceded by Love’s August 31, 2010 written extortionate demand to Narconon for $255,000.00. Narconon did not pay the demand. You are seeing the result. Earlier this summer, David Love flew to Belfast, Ireland, and posted a video recently expressing his hate for the Scientology religion: http://www.you tube.com/watch?v=hcoo6vGnosU

Recently, Mr. Love covertly went into a Church of Scientology in New York, illegally recording (without consent) an interview where a private Church staff member was attempting to assist him—the video reflects clearly his religious bias and his attempt— and failure—to bait the Church member into saying something Love believed to be negative. Carrying on with his harassment of Scientologists, he posted this recording on You Tube, as you can see here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsgjaWHWfFU

Love’s recent correspondence to counsel strongly suggests that Love’s motives are not pure and that there is a financial gain to his using the Times to generate negative media about Narconon. It should be evident to any impartial media source that David Love has an agenda which goes well beyond contributing to improving drug rehabilitation in America.

He has partnered with members of Anonymous, he has partnered with antireligionists who wish to harm the Church; he is called an anti-Scientologist by media as you can see here: “Anti-Scientology activist Will Visit Oklahoma’s Narconon Arrowhead” (http://thislandpress.com/roundups/anti-scientology-activiston-his-wayto-oklahomas-narconon-arrowhead/): “A Canadian activist who told The Village Voice, ‘I think I have Scientology by the balls,’ is focusing his attention on the religious group’s flagship drug treatment center in Oklahoma. Narconon Arrowhead, located in the small town of Canadian—near McAlester in southeastern Oklahoma…”

In contradiction to any current claims Mr. Love makes, he previously lauded the Narconon program and credited it for saving his life. David Love’s daughter, Amber Wold writes that at the time she brought Love to Narconon in 2008, he was in bad shape:

“When my father contacted me in 2008 saying he needed my help as he was living on the streets and had no where to turn. David was in trouble with the law and had been arrested in November 2008 for Possession of Stolen Property in excess of $5,000 as well as Possession of Stolen Property under $5000 and Break and Entry. He was hooked on Heroin as well as other drugs and said he had been in the hospital because he had overdosed. He was on a waiting list for a treatment program in BC but really needed my help. I told him everything about Narconon and how they had helped me and I said I would talk with the Management and see what I could do for him.” 

The evidence of his convictions are public record. Do your homework before you publish his lies. His daughter arranged for Love to be brought to Narconon Trois Rivieres in Canada.

She describes the results as follows: “When my father graduated from the Narconon Program in April 2009 he gave an amazing speech singing praise of Narconon and how the Program helped him. My father David believed in the program so much so that he became a staff member at the Narconon Facility in Trois-Rivieres, Quebec.”

You can see this video of David Love on how the Narconon program helped him, here:

BAM! Another liar bites the dust

Go make babies!

Marc and Claire Headley

On 24 July 2012 Marc and Claire Headley (whoismarcheadley.com) lost their appeal in a “forced labor” case against the Church of Scientology.

The Headleys had left the Sea Organization in 2005 and went their way until running out of money. So in 2009 they re-defined their so far fond memories about their time in the Sea Org for the purpose to get some money from the Church. The first instance already took them apart in 2010 and on 24 July 2012 Ninth Cicruit Court of Appeal decided again on it. Key quotes from the judgement:

- The Sea Organization is a religious order, participation in it is voluntary and those who want to leave can do so easily.

“The Sea Org is an elite religious order of the Church and acts as Scientology’s evangelical wing. The Sea Org demands much of its members, renders strict discipline, imposes stringent ethical and lifestyle constraints, and goes to great efforts to retain clergy and to preserve the integrity of the ministry.” (page 8398)

- Nothing and nobody forced the Headley’s to join, participate and stay in the Sea Organization. To the contrary, the Headley’s testified under oath that they enjoyed it and wanted to be there.

” Rather, the record overwhelmingly shows that the Headleys joined and voluntarily worked for the Sea Org because they believed that it was the right thing to do, because they enjoyed it, and because they thought that by working they were honoring the commitment that they each made and to which they adhered.” (page 8408)

- The Headleys could have left whenever they wanted to but did not.

“We emphasize that the Headleys had innumerable opportunities to leave the defendants. They lived outside of the Base and had access to vehicles, phones, and the Internet. They traveled away from the Base often. The security that they decry afforded them a multitude of opportunities to leave, as hundreds of other Sea Org members had done-whatever their commitments and whatever they may have been told regarding the permissibility of leaving. … They did not take any of their many opportunities to leave until 2005 and chose instead to stay with the defendants and to continue providing their ministerial services. They have not established a genuine issue of fact regarding whether they were victims of forced-labor violations.” (page 8410)

But they first chose to stay and then – as the last of numerous violations of agreed-upon moral codes – took a hike instead of leaving like anyone else would.

“Sea Org members learn that strict discipline is central to preserving the integrity of Scientology’s ministry. If a member fails to meet Scientology’s ethical standards, he may be disciplined with verbal warnings or rebukes, loss of privileges, removal from a post, diminution of responsibilities, manual labor, or expulsion. Sea Org members also participate in religious training and practices, including “confessionals.” In a confessional, a member confesses transgressions and may then be absolved or disciplined.

This demanding, ascetic life is not for everyone-and is not even for many of those who go through the Sea Org’s extensive training and preparation. A member may formally withdraw his vows and leave the ministry through a process called “routing out.” Routing out allows a member to remain a Scientologist in good standing. The process involves filling out a form and normally includes participating in Scientology ethics programs. Routing out can take weeks or months. During that time members are excused from their posts but are expected to continue serving the Church by performing chores.” (page 8399)

What, no Suppressive Person declare for those leaving the Sea Org? Exactly. Luckily the court cleared that up too. And what about the people that “blow”?

“Some Scientologists leave the Sea Org without routing out – a practice known as “blowing” – but the Sea Org discourages members from doing so. When a member leaves without routing out, other members may band together to try to locate that member and attempt to persuade him to return to the Sea Org. Scientologists believe that such an effort-known as a “blow drill” – is integral to their efforts to clear the planet and to help their members (even departed ones) achieve salvation. So important is this to the Church that a blown member may be disciplined if he returns or may be declared a “suppressive person.” Being so declared is akin to being excommunicated or shunned, and can cause blown members to lose contact with Scientologist family or friends.” (page 8400)

Obviously. If a friend of yours goes missing you would go looking for her too, right?

And in the end this turned out to be one of those sad “apostate” stories: The Headley’s enjoyed their stay and work in the Sea Organization and only after they had repeatedly betrayed and lied to their former friends they found something “wrong” about it.

- L

PS: The full decision for download here.

PPS: Update on ScientologyMyths.info

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